Schizoid vs Schizotypal: What’s the Difference?

Posted on February 10, 2022

Schizoid personality disorder and schizotypal personality disorder are two of the most misunderstood mental health conditions. Many people are not sure what the difference between schizoid and schizotypal is, or even how to tell them apart. In this blog post, we will discuss the most fundamental differences between schizoid and schizotypal personality disorders, as well as some of the symptoms that characterize each condition.

Do you have schizoid or schizotypal personality disorder?

It’s estimated that approximately 9 percent of American adults have at least one personality disorder. 

This means there could potentially be millions of people currently struggling with personality disorders alone and without a diagnosis. Personality disorders are mental illnesses that affect the personality, emotions, and mind.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the global burden of disease due to poor psychological well-being is at around 300 million, or 3% of the population rate. This figure reflects an average across all age groups and genders.

Characteristics of Cluster A Personality Disorders

schizoid personality disorder

Schizoid personality disorder and schizotypal personality disorder are two of the conditions that fall under cluster A personality disorders. People with schizoid or schizotypal personalities tend to be perceived as odd or eccentric by others, which is why they are collectively referred to as ‘odd’ disorders.

While schizoid personality disorder and schizotypal personality disorder do have similarities, there are also some key differences between them.

Cluster A Personality Disorders Include:

– Paranoid Personality Disorder (PPD) – characterized by an ongoing distrust of other people and a belief that their motives are malicious

– Schizoid Personality Disorder (SPD) – characterized by an inability to form close relationships, often due to social anxiety or fear of rejection

– Schizotypal Personality Disorder (STPD) – characterized by unusual beliefs and behaviors such as magical thinking

Characteristics of Cluster B Personality Disorders

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) describes Cluster B personality disorders as often being characterized by extreme, unpredictable emotions or behavior. People with these disorders may have trouble managing their emotions, leading to impulsive actions or erratic behavior.

Cluster B Personality Disorders Include:

– Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) – characterized by disregard for the rights of others and a lack of empathy, often causing physical or emotional harm to others

– Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) – characterized by unstable moods, behaviors and relationships that can lead to frequent changes in jobs, friendships and goals; this is sometimes called emotion dysregulation disorder

– Histrionic Personality Disorder (HPD) – characterized by constant attention seeking through inappropriate displays of sexual attractiveness or overly dramatic expressions of emotion

What is Schizoid Personality Disorder?

Schizoid personality disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by a lack of interest in social activities, as well as a lack of emotional expression. People with schizoid personality disorder may appear to be emotionless or detached from their surroundings. They often have difficulty forming relationships with other people, and may prefer to spend time alone.

Schizoid Personality Disorder Symptoms

The symptoms of schizoid personality disorder can vary from person to person, but they may include the following:

– A lack of interest in social activities

– A lack of emotional expression

– difficulty forming relationships and sexual relationships with others

– preferring to spend time alone

Risk Factors For Schizoid Personality Disorder

The exact cause of schizoid personality disorder is not known. However, the following risk factors may pose an increased risk to a person’s likelihood for developing schizoid personality disorder:

– Having schizotypal or schizoaffective disorders, which are related to schizophrenia but with milder symptoms

– Experiencing trauma in early childhood such as abuse or neglect from parents or caregivers

Diagnosing Schizoid Personality Disorder Diagnosis of schizoid personality disorder can be challenging because there is no definitive test that can confirm it. People with schizoid personality disorder often have difficulty expressing their emotions and may minimize them when talking about themselves in therapy sessions. A doctor will usually rely on clinical interviews, surveys and questionnaires to diagnose this specific mental disorder.

Treatment Options For Schizoid Personality Disorder

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating schizoid personality disorder. However, some of the most common treatment options approved by the American Psychiatric Association include cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medications, and self-help groups. People with schizoid personality disorder may also benefit from family therapy or couples counseling if they have a close relationship with someone else.

People with schizoid personality disorder often withdraw from social activities and prefer to be alone. They typically have few, if any, close friends and can be quite content living an isolated lifestyle. Because people with schizoid personality disorder seldom experience negative emotions like sadness or anger, they may not realize that they need help. If you think you may have schizoid personality disorder, it’s important to talk to your doctor and seek professional advice from a trained medical professional.

They may be diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder if they have some, but not all, of the symptoms of schizoid personality disorder. People with schizotypal personality disorder often have odd beliefs, faulty beliefs, or magical thinking, which can make it difficult for them to function in everyday life. They may also experience paranoid ideas or brief psychotic episodes.

Like people with schizoid personality disorder, people with schizotypal personality disorder usually don’t seek help on their own. If you think you may have schizotypal personality disorder, it’s important to talk to your doctor.

What is Schizotypal Personality Disorder?

schizotypal disorder

Schizotypal personality disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by odd thoughts and eccentric behavior, as well as distorted perceptions of reality.

People with schizotypal personality disorder may exhibit strange body language, speak in an unusual way, or dress oddly. They often have difficulty distinguishing between reality and fantasy, and may believe that they possess special powers or are in communication with supernatural beings.

Schizotypal Personality Disorder Symptoms

Symptoms of schizotypal personality disorder include :

– Odd beliefs or faulty beliefs, magical thinking, including superstitions and paranormal experiences

– Unusual perceptual experiences, such as seeing objects or people in a different way than others do

– Difficulty forming close relationships, due to distorted views of other people and an inability to trust them

– social isolation, social anxiety, or trouble forming healthy relationships

– Inappropriate emotions and expressions or eccentric behavior

– Flat affect (a lack of emotion) or inappropriate emotional responses

– Strange speech patterns, including speaking too loudly, rapidly, or quietly; using made up words; or switching rapidly between topics

Risk Factors For Schizotypal Personality Disorder:

– Having a family history of schizotypal personality disorder or schizophrenia

– Being exposed to violence, abuse, or neglect during childhood

– Having experienced a traumatic event during childhood

– Being isolated from others for long periods of time

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating schizotypal personality disorder. However, some common treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, and social skills training. CBT can help people with schizotypal personality disorder learn how to change their thoughts and behaviors that are causing them problems.

Treatment Options For Schizoid Personality Disorder

Medications are often part of schizoid personality disorder treatment. They may help relieve symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and sleep problems—commonly experienced by people with schizoid personality disorder. Antipsychotics, antidepressants, and mood stabilizers can also be used to treat schizotypal personality disorder; however, they are not effective in treating schizoid personality disorder alone.

Behavioral therapy is another key treatment for schizoid personality disorder. This type of therapy can help people with schizoid personality disorder learn how to change their thoughts and behaviors that are causing them problems. Group therapy may also be beneficial, as it allows people with schizoid personality disorder to interact with others who have similar symptoms.

Other Personality Disorders

There are ten personality disorders in all. Personality disorders are a type of mental illness in which people have traits that cause them to feel and behave in socially distressing ways, limiting their ability to function in relationships and other areas of life, such as work or school.

When To Seek Treatment From A Mental Health Professional

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed above and they are causing you distress or interfering with your ability to form relationships or healthy relationships with friends, co-workers, or family members, function, it is important to seek help from a mental health professional. A mental health professional can provide you with diagnosis, treatment, and support.

– Schizoid personality disorder is characterized by a lack of interest in social or close relationships, a tendency to be withdrawn and isolated, and an indifference to both positive and negative emotions.

– Schizotypal personality disorder is characterized by odd thoughts and eccentric behavior, distorted perceptions of reality, and problems with social interaction.

– The main difference between schizoid and schizotypal personality disorders is that schizoids do not experience the same level of cognitive or perceptual distortions and odd thinking like those with schizotypal personality disorder.

Get The Help That You Need Today

Those who are suffering from these mental disorders will often face mental health challenges — but there are ways that you can get the help you need! At Crownview Telehealth Institute we are proud to provide treatment for both major psychoses (like schizophrenia) AND character disorders including schizoid & SSDs specifically.

When you’re ready, simply give us a call at 833-957-2690 or fill out the contact form HERE to start your journey to a better and happier life.

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